Are more Americans suicidal because of opioids?

Is there a correlation between America’s increased #Suicide rates and the #OpioidEpidemic? The negative effects of inappropriately prescribed #Opioids on public health are multiple. However, the data shows that there is a promising #PatientCentric solution that is highly effective in preventing the inappropriate first exposure to opioids for #Patients.

The Opioid Epidemic Deserves More than a Closed Formulary

The national #WorkersCompensation community is at risk of losing the plot of the #OpioidEpidemic. The assault against opioid abuse may be relying too much on over-simplified medicine. It is essential to expand the conversation to emphasize the importance of the overall care of a patient and improve the tracking of health outcomes. The discussion can no longer be just about drugs and potential savings.

Content Out of Context

Regulating the use of evidence-based medicine standards by state jurisdictions tends to polarize workers’ compensation stakeholders – sometimes for good reason. However, an important attribute that is evident in a well-developed medically responsible EBM standard can be easily overlooked: EBM guidance may not always be unequivocal.

The data is clear. The impact that EBM has on improved health outcomes in workers’ compensation is overwhelmingly positive. Continue reading to get my take on why it is counter-productive to use the content out of context.

A Case for National Standards for State Workers’ Compensation

In the Workers’ Compensation system, variances from one state to another seem endless. The source of variability is often the disparity in resources available to state regulators across jurisdictions. Is it reasonable to suggest that the varying availability of resources from state-to-state present limitations for regulators in their pursuit to appropriately research prospective public policy that will improve system outcomes?
Would establishing national standards help level the playing field for states having to make due with less available resources?

Removing Friction from California’s Workers’ Compensation System

#California’s success in removing friction from its #WorkersCompensation system hinges on all of the state’s stakeholders committing to work from the same standards and speaking the same language. Anything short of this type of cooperation is both counter-productive and an affront toward the collective effort to produce #ImprovedHealthOutcomes for California’s #InjuredWorkers.

Why Standards Matter

The challenges experienced in the care and claim continuum are plentiful and very difficult to navigate. Providers, insurers, employers, and employees deserve content measured and deemed trustworthy according to non-bias standards to guide injured workers to recovery.

With the deep knowledge base and hands on experience of how quickly a workers’ compensation claim can go into free fall toward catastrophic health and recovery outcomes for the injured worker, why aren’t more “thought-leaders” challenging the status quo to identify inadvertent, or in some cases intended, consequences in their respective areas of expertise? Let me know your thoughts on “Why Standards Matter”.

The Truth Regarding Outcomes in Texas and the Guideline Never Discussed

As Louisiana HB 592 moves through legislature, Texas’ workers’ compensation system is again the center of national discussion. Texas Commissioner Ryan Brennan doubled down on advocacy for other states to adopt the Texas-model formulary proclaiming it “a model for the nation” and “the inspiration for many other states’ proposed formularies” citing improvements in return-to-work, medical costs and access to care. Surely, a system as unique as Texas relies on more than a binary list of drugs to accomplish the outcomes documented in its 2016 biennial report. Here is “The Truth Regarding Outcomes in Texas and the Guideline Never Discussed”. Due to reference of the Texas Labor Code, I welcome feedback specifically from the legal community on this piece.